Tag Archives: Nancy Barr

Perspectives on Photography – Panel Discussion this Friday, May 20, 7p.m.@the DIA

Detroit's Cary Loren will weigh in on photography this Friday at the DIA. (c) Cary Loren, 2011

What does it mean for a photograph to be authentic? How does the so-called manipulation of photographs influence our perception and understanding of medium? What is the value of learning to “read” photographic images? A panel of Detroit-area photographers, arts professionals and educators will meet to discuss these issues during the program Perspectives on Photography: Authenticity, Invention and Image  which takes place this Friday, May 20, 7 p.m. at the Detroit Institute of Arts, Lecture Hall.

Please join DIA Associate Curator Nancy Barr and moderator Leonard Walle, collector and president of the Forum for Prints, Drawings, and Photographs who will engage panelists in dialogue. Participants include Kyohei Abe, artist and director of the Detroit Center for Contemporary Photography; Michelle Andonian, editorial and documentary photographer; Sara Blair, University of Michigan professor and author; Cary Loren, author, artist, and musician; and Corine Vermeulen, photographer and 2009 Kresge Fellow. A Q&A will follow the panel discussion.

This event is free with museum admission. This program is sponsored by the Forum for Prints, Drawings, and Photographs.

Questions for our panel? Please post them below.

The First 100 Years of Photography – Exhibition to Open Sept. 2@the DIA

Julia Margaret Cameron, Enid from Idylls of the King, 1874

Julia Margaret Cameron, Enid from Idylls of the King, 1874

On September 2 the DIA opens a new exhibition, Photography – The First 100 Years: A Survey from the DIA’s Collection. Taking a look at the early years of photography and its development as a new art form, the DIA presents a survey of 90 works from its collection. Included are a number of notable rare works from the 19th century as well as iconic imagery from the 1920s and 1930s. Photographs by Julia Margaret Cameron, Edward Weston, Walker Evans, Margaret Bourke White, Dorothea Lange in addition to 50 other pioneers and great innovators of the medium are on view in the exhibition which runs through January 3, 2010.

Unknown Photographer, Soldier and Companion, 1861-65, tintype.

Unknown Photographer, Soldier and Companion, 1861-65, tintype.

One of the highlights from this exhibition is a tintype portrait of an African American couple from the 1860s. The process, a photographic image made on metal, appeared in the 1850s.  The DIA was fortunate enough to acquire it back in 2001, when it went on the auction block with other items from the collection of Jackie Napoleon Wilson, a Detroiter who developed an important and rare collection of 19th-century portraits of African Americans over the years. The exhibition moves onward from the 19th century with sections devoted to the pictorialist, modernist and social documentary eras. Photography – The First 100 Years kicks off a new and exciting season of photography exhibitions this fall 2009 and into spring 2010 at the DIA – here’s the round-up:

Avedon Fashion Photographs 1944-2000– opening October 18, 2009 through January 17, 2010. The DIA will host the first large-scale fashion retrospective since Richard Avedon’s death in 2004. Organized by the International Center for Photography, New York, the exhibition includes 181 images – many are well-known photographs – in addition to magazines and other interesting ephemera that illustrates the long and legendary career of one of America’s most successful and interesting photographers.

Detroit Experiences: Robert Frank Photographs 1955 opening March 3 through July 4, 2010. This exhibition includes over 60 black-and white photographs taken by Robert Frank in Detroit. Made during his travels through the U.S. photographing for his book The Americans, Frank observed Detroiters as they lived and worked at mid century in the U.S. In this rare body of work, many of which will be on view for the first time at the DIA, Frank documented the day-to-day lives of Americans as he tried to mingle with assembly line workers at the Rouge Factory, took in a movie at the Gratiot Drive-In, and experienced public life on Belle Isle and in the streets of Detroit. All were part of the Detroit experience as Frank perceived it over fifty years ago.